Courses in English

We have four courses at undergraduate level offered in English for exchange/Erasmus students, two of the courses are open to all students.

From Barter to Bitcoin: Monetary Systems for a Sustainable Future

The course introduces the topic of monetary systems in theory and in practice. It focuses on how today's international monetary systems have developed historically and, in particular, how today's monetary system may facilitate or impede the transition to a sustainable economy.
Course code: 2EH302 / ECTS credits: 7,5 / Entry requirements: 60 credits in the social sciences / Open to all students

Rentier Capitalism: (Neo)extractivism and its Discontents

This course explores the historical shift from extraction - the process of relying on nature for the sustenance of human life - to extractivism, a set of practices premised on capital accumulation and power inequalities. We also expand our field of vision to include rentierism, the broad contemporary phenomenon of money-making through ownership and control of assets of different kinds. We thus engage in debates about whether extractivism and its contemporary forms can convincingly be seen as a central feature of capitalism currently - namely, rentier capitalism.
Course code: 2EH303 / ECTS credits: 7,5 / Entry requirements: 60 credits in the social sciences / Open to all students

Why Some Countries are Rich: an Economic History of the World

The course applies a general and global perspective on economic history and transformation from pre-historic times up to the present. The emphasis is on the period c.1000-present and on the economic history of the Western world. The global economy is seen as a system with interconnected parts from the global to the local economy. Theories about economic transformation will be presented. A key question for the course will be why some countries are rich and others not.
Course code: 2EH370 / ECTS credits: 7.5 / Open to all students

Sweden´s Economic and Social Development in the 19th and 20th Centuries

This course deals in some depth with the extensive structural and economic changes which have characterised Sweden since the mid 19th century. This takes the form of a chronological analysis of the rapid transition from a typical poor agrarian society to an industrial welfare state. Which were the driving forces behind the development? Why did they occur so late? Which were the production factors so favourable to Sweden? These are some of the questions activated in the course. The background and substance of the concept of The Swedish Model is also dealt with.
Course code: 2EH371 / ECTS credits: 7.5 / Open to all students

Research Paper in Economic History

Course Content: The aim of the course is to train the student in basic research work, scientific writing, the application of suitable research methods, critical evaluation of sources and in a seminar to defend her/his study. This is a limited independent research task with a duration of approximately 8 to 10 weeks. This work ends up with a scientific report of 30 - 40 pages of typed text. Professional supervision is continuously given. The basic task is to solve a well defined delimited research problem within a wider economic historic context by applying well established scientific methods and, when applicable, to make use of theoretical frameworks.
Course code: 2EH372 / ECTS credits: 15 / Only offered to Erasmus/exchange students

Essay Writing

Course Content: The aim of the course is to train the student in basic research work, proper use of sources and scientific writing. This is a limited independent research exercise with a duration of approximately four to five weeks. The basic task is to solve a well-defined delimited research problem within a wider economic historic context. The work ends up with an essay of approx. 20 pages of typed text.
Course code: 2EH373 / ECTS credits: 7.5 / Only offered to Erasmus/exchange students

Last modified: 2023-06-16